Is it Between You and Me or You and I?

Charis for writing
Lesson #3

English has the subject pronouns: I, YOU,HE, SHE, IT, WE, and THEY; and the object pronouns: ME, YOU, HIM, HER, IT, US and THEM.

Subject because it is the doer of the action and object because it is the recipient of the action.

Very simple but often forgotten when it comes to you and I/me.

You and I is used when it is the subject of the sentence.
Eg. You and I will make a good pair

You and me is when it occupies the object position and often has a preposition before it.
Eg. This is about you and me

If u ever get confused, try replacing I with the subject pronouns and ME with the object pronouns to see if they fit.

So it is ‘between you and me’ because we say ‘between you and him’ not he.

Hope you learnt something this week. Enjoy good writing. We are back next week😊

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Word Study: LOOSE, LOSE, LOSS and LOST.

Lesson 2
Per a special request, we are repeating an old lesson this week.

Word Study: LOOSE, LOSE,  LOSS and LOST.

Because of the closeness of their pronunciation, people tend to confuse the orthography of ‘loose’ and ‘lose’ and that of ‘lost’ and ‘loss.’ But these words are not synonymous and have different meanings,  sometimes very unrelated.

LOOSE: It is an adjective used to describe the situation where things are not compact or tightly fixed in place and also to mean when something is not fitting tightly.  So we say: ‘She is wearing a loose T-shirt.’ Or: ‘This knot is rather loose.’
The verb related to this is loosen.
‘Could you loosen my hair?’

LOSE: This is a verb which means to be deprived of something or someone one previously had. It is also the opposite of win.
‘He can easily lose his new glasses.’
‘Arsenal will lose the match against Chelsea tomorrow.’

LOSS: This is the noun used to describe the situation of losing something or someone. So we say : ‘The loss of their father has greatly affected them.’
It is also what we use when we want to say we don’t know how to go about something :’ To be at a loss.’

LOST : This is the adjective used to describe things we no longer have access to.
‘I found your lost book today’.
It is also the past for ‘lose’.
‘ We lost our money in the market yesterday’.

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Yourselves vs Each other vs One another

So, is there a difference between these three words and if there is, what is it? At the level of similarity, these are all pronouns but are not necessarily interchangeable.

Each other is used when an action is reciprocated between two people ie one does it and the other does the same in return
Eg: A couple must love each other

One another is used like each other and its used when the action is between more than two parties.
Eg: The players shook hands with one another.

This is traditional grammar. Today however, ‘each other’ and ‘one another’ are used interchangeably and this is widely accepted (though I prefer the old view). So we can say: The traders greeted each other/ one another.

As for yourselves, it is the plural of yourself and no other party is involved. ‘Each person to do the action on yourself’
Eg: Say good things to yourselves daily. ( to yourself not another!)

Hope you learnt something this week. Be careful when using these pronouns next time. We’re back next week. Enjoy good writing😊

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